Tap anywhere to start

There may be trouble ahead

Illustrations by Ellie Foreman-Peck

Don’t worry if you’ve gone off Netflix — the theatrics of US politics will keep you entertained. While the Republican Party is at war with itself, the stories of two totemic congresswomen can help us understand the schism, says Oliver Wiseman

Political parties are like families. Happy ones are all alike. Every unhappy one is unhappy in its own way. After a tumultuous few months, the US Republican Party is a very unhappy family. When Donald Trump refused to concede defeat, he pushed an outlandish lie about a stolen election.

This divisive fantasy helped his party lose control of the Senate in two elections in Georgia and culminated in the violent desecration of the Capitol building on 6 January by a mob of the former president’s supporters. Those grim scenes led to Trump’s second impeachment trial in as many years.

He would be acquitted but tarnished, with a record seven Republicans voting to convict a member of their own party. The upshot of this unfortunate series of events is a party out of power and at war with itself in a way that makes previous spats look tame.

Liz Cheney and Marjorie Taylor-Greene

“Cheney the Younger has quickly developed her own reputation for toughness”

READ THE FULL ARTICLE
READ THE FULL ARTICLE

“One Republican colleague has compared [cheney] to Margaret Thatcher: ‘A woman who stands her ground in an otherwise male-dominated world’”

READ THE FULL ARTICLE
READ THE FULL ARTICLE

“[greene] quickly became known as the member for QAnon, the conspiracy theory that claims Trump was secretly working to defeat a cabal of Satan-worshipping child abusers in senior government positions”

READ THE FULL ARTICLE
READ THE FULL ARTICLE

“perhaps the mistake is to think that one side of the party’s divide has to triumph definitively”

READ THE FULL ARTICLE
READ THE FULL ARTICLE